Bucket List Blues

I have a guilty confession to make – over the past few weeks, I’ve read the entire series of Outlander books by Diana Gabaldon, complete in all their historical/fantastical bodice-ripping flummerous glory. Why? Well, at the top of my bucket list of walks, I’d like to try to do the walk from John O’Groats in Scotland

to Land’s End in England, and in thinking about Scotland and the Highlands, I thought of the Outlander TV series now running on Netflix which is a favourite of my wife, and that made me think about the Outlander books themselves. And in reading the books, which are set partially in Scotland and partially in the US at the time of the American Revolutionary War, and involve characters who are Loyalists to the Crown, I thought of another bucket list walk, to retrace the steps of my ancestors who were Loyalists who had to leave upstate New York to make their way into Canada near Fort Erie

and thence along the Talbot Trail to Essex County in south-west Ontario, where I was eventually born.

Bucket lists, I think, are as much about imagination as they are about actual plans, and whatever is on your list reflects the kind of person you see yourself as. Having a bucket list composed of famous works of art to view in person, or golf courses to play, famous restaurants to visit, or journeys to take, then the fact that your list includes such things says a lot about who you are and what you value.

And in my case, my bucket list is about walks and treks (no surprise), and mostly it reflects long multi-day journeys through places redolent of history. Sometimes that history is of countries and nations and peoples, sometimes it’s about the history of the towns and cities and villages I’d pass through, and sometimes it’s the history of myself and my family. In many cases, that history is personal, because I’ve visited many of these places before and they’ve touched a chord within me which I’d like to rekindle.

Amongst the many frustrations of COVID is the sense of plans on hold, of being stuck on pause and unable to hit play. When I retired, in January 2020, I had set out in my mind a series of walks that would slowly work down my bucket list. I fully expected to have crossed several off my list this past year, and instead there’s just been a gloomy sense of waiting and waiting and waiting, with no clear vision of when I can get back to that program.

It’s a first world problem to be sure, and many people would like to have the luxury of even contemplating a bucket list in the first place. I can’t, with any sense of morality, consider myself hard done by. So I sit and I wait and I walk around the neighbourhood and I read things like Outlander and dream of Scottish highlands.

Bucket List Walks

An ever-changing list of walks I’ve done or would like to do.

  1. John O’Groats in Scotland to Land’s End in Cornwall, the length of Great Britain
  2. The Bruce Trail, Ontario
    • Niagara Section
    • Iroquois Section
    • Toronto Section
    • Caledon Section
    • Dufferin Highland Section
    • Beaver Valley Section
    • Blue Mountain Section
    • Sydenham Section
    • Peninsula Section
  3. Yonge Street (from Lake Ontario to Lake Simcoe)
  4. The Sli Dhun na nGall – the trails of Donegal in Ireland, including:
    • The Blue Stack Way
    • Slí Cholmcille
    • Slí An Earagail
    • Slí Na Finne
    • Slí Na Rosann
  5. The European Ramblers E8 trail, from Dublin to Kerry
  6. The Malin Head to Mizen Head path from the northern tip of Ireland to the southwestern tip
  7. Hadrian’s Wall path, England
  8. The Thames Path in England, from source to the sea
  9. Lord Simcoe’s Ride (Fort George in Niagara-on-the-Lake to Fort York in Toronto)
  10. The Toronto Cross (west to east and south to north across Toronto)
  11. Toronto Waterfront Trail (Humber River to Rouge River)
  12. The Confederation Trail in PEI
  13. Waterfront to wine
    • East, from Toronto to Prince Edward County along the Waterfront Trail
    • West, from Toronto to Niagara along the Waterfront Trail
    • South, from Toronto to Pelee Island along the Waterfront Trail
  14. The Great Trail in Southern Ontario (within 2 hours of Toronto)
    • 100km so far including
    • Toronto Waterfront Trail
    • Toronto Pan-Am Trail
    • Toronto Pan-Am Connector
    • Niagara River Recreational Trail
    • Pickering Waterfront Trail
    • Durham County Recreational Trails
    • Laura Secord Legacy Trail
    • City of Hamiton Trails
    • Fort Erie to Hamilton connector trails
    • Hamilton to Brantford Rail Trail
    • Brantford to Kitchener connector trails
    • Kitchener to Elora connector trails
    • Elora to Barrie connector trails
  15. The Great Trail T-O-M walk – Toronto to Ottawa to Montreal
  16. Montreal to Toronto via the Waterfront Trail
  17. Camino de Santiago, specifically the Comino Portuguese from Porto in Lisbon to Campostella in Spain
  18. Oakridge Moraine Trail around greater Toronto
  19. Manhattan Shore Walk (circumference of the island of Manhattan)
  20. The Newfoundland T’Railway Trail, from Channel Port Aux Basques to St. John’s
  21. Fundy walk, from Moncton to Saint John along the Bay of Fundy
  22. The Te Araroa Trail in New Zealand from the northern tip of the North Island to the southern tip of the South Island
  23. The GR1 Tour de Paris
  24. The Bradt Brothers Trail, tracing my ancestors from New Amsterdam (now New York) up the Hudson to Albany and then west across upstate NY, across to Fort Erie, and along the Talbot Trail to Leamington in Essex County, SW Ontario.
  25. The Nova Scotia Rail Trail circuit, from Lunenburg to Bridgewater to Middleton to Wolfville to Halifax to Lunenburg
  26. The Cabot Trail around the northern end of Cape Breton island